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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
and bennett, the head of this new party on the right. it's unclear to me, i think you have a knowledge deficit that you didn't have the last time around. when you had someone with barak's experience, begin's experience, all these guys are gone. and the question is, does that mean the wheels, the brakes have come off the train? and that now it's more of a runaway car? or are you saying, no, not at all. livni might be there, and there'll be people who might not have the same amount of years of experience, but are maybe counterpoints to some of the other forces. so what's unclear to me yet is to what extent that forum that netanyahu relied upon, how central is that going to be? what is going to mean the loss of that knowledge, that deficit of experience? but i do think for the key factor, he definitely sees that his goal is that israel just be a normal western country, that the middle class have a better quality of life. sounds very familiar to people here. but he has said that the road to that is dealing with palestinian issue. not dividing jerusalem, but everything else. we've got to work this
reasonable. but if you unpack it, you find out that first of all, in this so-called billion dollar deficit, which of course is the press release deficit, it always changes later on. the actual amount of money this will cost, especially, if it's done correctly, which god forbid they've never done anything correctly before in terms of school closings. this will cost almost a billion dollars itself. so i don't believe any of this. rahm emanuel doesn't know the truth if it would slap him in the face. this is a military style campaign. school closings are based on closing military bases. it's also based on information coming from an unaccredited superintendent organization. but let me just say this -- in th they. >> they say these are poorly performing schools. they're not going to have to travel more than a mile to reach their new school. and any one traveling over an extra.8 of a mile will be bussed. so they're trying to -- >> you're also spending more money. and, again, they started out this conversation when they said they had to close schools by underutilization. they said we're not lookin
need to do it in a way that both stabilizes our deficit and debt, makes critical investments in growing our economy and preserves the core of the programs on which americans rely. this is not just about numbers. it is also about values. it is also about priorities. >> sreenivasan: republican jeff sessions of alabamaĆ§Ć³ called democrats out for how they were using the word balance during the debate. >> they're also using the word balance. they hope people will hear it and think that this means they have a balanced budget. they know they don't have a balanced budget. they won't tell the american people they don't have one. they just use the word. but it's not in their document. >> sreenivasan: sessions forced a vote on an amendment to put democrats on record in opposition to balancing the budget by the end of the decade. it failed on a near-party line vote. lawmakers in north dakota moved to outlaw abortion today. the republican-controlled legislature passed a bill defining life as starting at conception. it is one in a series of anti- abortion measures that have passed this year. the bi
deficit. for students in detroit problems with the education system are being magnified by that community's economic troubles. if you look statewide a quarter of michigan children under 17 were living in poverty in 2011. compare that to detroit where the number is more than twice that much. it is 57%, folks. nearly two in three detroit children 5 and under are below the poverty line. msnbc's correspondent joins us live from detroit where she'll cohost a summit on education today and a student town hall tomorrow. those numbers are frightening and daunting. >> they really are startling numbers. i've got my notebook with me because i'm going to school today, chris. it has a lot of people worried and concerned and working to change the dynamics of those numbers. that's what we'll be talking about here. many people are also concerned about the fact, the elephant in the room we can't dismiss that come monday the city of detroit will be under the auspices of an emergency financial manager. people should also know for the past four years detroit schools have been under emergency management and in
, taxes, spending and deficits. and the notion that they're going to somehow come together, there's really no, no, i guess, carrot for them to go after here. >> and then they go home for two weeks. >> sure. >> and the question is are they going to hear anything from their constituents that's going to move anybody. i don't know. >> i think that they're not. and the best chance that they had to potentially hear about it was with the potential for a government shutdown, which has now been averted. so again, back to this new pace rhine of these big debates over real issues that are kind of going nowhere. and a new baseline that incidentally it's interesting because their stopgap spending bill that was passed yesterday did mark something of a breakthrough in that the appropriators in the house and the senate, the bipartisan leaderships thereof were able to come together and come up with a spending plan that keeps the government solvent and keeps it operating. and so i think that now we are going to see the appropriators get, you know, being able to get together hopefully and work out these, you
if you don't tax device makers? it comes from the taxes. this is going to be added on the deficit. they constructed a budget, that made it look as if, as obama promised, not going to cost the treasury a dime. well, the cbo says it will cost $1.3 trillion over a decade. so there is an increase in $1.3 trillion plus a dime in taxes. so that it ends up looking like it's not going to cost. but there will be increases in taxes everywhere. this one will be canceled. it's ridiculous. this is the one area, medical devices where the u.s. has tremendous advantage in technology over the rest of the world. why would you kill an industry that is so productive? so, the money will be cut. it will have to come out of taxes. the $1.3 trillion will become $1.6 trillion. it will climb. ultimately it will be a drag on the economy. i think ultimately after it hits and you get a train wreck and all the inefficiencies people will say in a couple of years, why don't we adopt a canadian system? cut out the middleman. and stop all the waste. simply have a simple system. government is completely in control
saying we want a lot more spending, most of it paid for by deficit this year and next. we'll see a lot of defectses from the democrat budget resolution. we saw a vote yesterday in the senate which was, you talked with stuart varney about. repealing the medical device tax. we're likely to see a lot of defects from the white house and the democratic leadership proposal to have a lot more spending in year and coming years. we saw the opening mark of that yesterday. bill: peter cottontail still on the schedule for the 1st of april. we'll bring you back and we'll continue this little discussion about what's right and what's not given the budget crunch. >> bring back the white house tours. bring back the white house tours. bring back the white house tours. there we go. bill: enjoy austin. see you soon. heather. heather: the clock is ticking as the country is on a verge of collapse. can a deal be reached before there is a i had on people's bank accounts and is this something we could see happen to your bank account? bill: also a scared homeowner, well, you won't believe what they did when a h
the deficit long term. the democrat budget, of course, talks about a big tax hike over ten years of about $1 trillion. republicans say they're not going to do that. they want to roll back obama care. these are the two outside extreme positions. that's where we're at now. going forward can they come together and find some middle ground? >> weigh in on that, lauren. is there really a chance for reconciling these two extreme budgets? >> i think david kind of nailed it here. when it comes to the budgets, they're just a little bit too far, but this budget process isn't a waste of time. i think it's promising that they went through regular order. this is something that the senate hasn't done. they haven't passed a budget this a long time. i think what we'll see is this may open the door to pass some appropriations bilts for 2014 and this could put us on the road for a long-term deficit reduction deal. these are just opening gothss here. >> david, as i look at your article, it focuses on immigration reform and how it's making its way through the senate. where do things stand right now? >> alex, the
what's called video deficit when they watch the screen passively, they can't really assemble a coherent narrative about what's happening. the way our brains develop, we need some interaction, which a tablet actually supplies because you do something and you get a response for it. it's not a substitute for a loving care giver of some sort in your life, but at least it's responding. >> i do wonder, though, about attention spans. i have two kids, 6 and 10. i'm one of these brooklyn mommies that buys hand made wooden toys from germany andy courages the kids to read books. although when i need them to be quiet, i will hand them the kindle fire. and i do notice that they're a little more -- my son is a little more agitated after playing games on that. is there anything there to worry about really? >> let's start by saying your son's a boy. i'd say based on my experience -- and those who grew occupy without these devices is the same. it's true, all things in moderation, although as part of her expiration of the story, hannah kind of experimented on her own kid and let her youngest play as much
be in a deficit in 10 years the argument however is that the senate budget creates jobs and economic growth from the middle out. now, that's according to the author. senator pattie murray. for the democrats the vote is a really big accomplishment. >> first of all, over the last two decades the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we have done 101. the average vote arama 70 amendments. twice as many. doing this has been a her could herculessen feet. senator murray and senator sessions. >> during the vote senators were facing more than 500 amendments which were filed but 70 were voted on. of course when you do take a 13 hour six minute vote there has to be a little bit of humor. >> it is good to say that as -- as of this time, 5:00 a.m., there has not been a day without a budget being passed in the united states senate. >> and some interesting observations from the vote. all democrats voted yeah with the exception of for up for re-election 2014. unfriendly to democrats. mark beg gich from alaska. baucus from montana. pryor from arc. hagan from north carolina. recently passed the rya
larks newark, new jersey, washington and detroit have all closed schools to cut budget deficits. and that brings us to education nation. which is part of an ongoing commitment by nbc news, to foster a national dialogue about the future of education in america. today education nation is on the road in detroit with he had nbc's education correspondent, rehema ellis. >> we want to talk about what's happening to the schools in michigan. but in detroit, we can't help but talk about what's happening in the city of detroit. joining me right now is the governor of michigan, rick snyder. and the news of the day is that on monday, your emergency financial manager for detroit is going to go to work. there's a lot of controversy around it. people are protesting, saying it's unconstitutional. that he's going to sell off some iconic pieces of the city in order to balance the budget. what do you say? >> well it is legal. this is a crisis. and we need to turn it around. and if you look at, we've had success with emergency managers. if you look at detroit public schools, they've had one for the
for some tax revenue to help reduce the deficit, calls for some more stimulus, more spending that way. and we're in this funny process where today we will wrap up, i think a little beforehand technically, but we'll wrap up 50 hours of debate and then start the unlimited amendment process. basically, any issue you've ever heard your callers call in and complain about we might see votes on today. it could be stuff like drone strikes against u.s. citizens, and it could be taxes and repealing health care and all these different issues that may come up. the point to remember, though, is this is all adding on to a nonbinding budget resolution. so it's interesting, and it may give people clues as to what appetites there are in the senate to pass or repeal certain elements of policy. but it's not binding right away. >> host: headline in your publication, "the hill," says the senate is poised to pass a budget. do you expect this to pass, and what's the significance? where does it go from here? >> guest: we do expect it. i think the democrats will be able to control the process and get it passe
, nor sleet senator snow nor deficit. no word this morning, saturday mail delivery is back on. >>> and 911 shocker. >> can you tell can you tell me by tapping on the phone once that do not open the door. >> 911, where is your image? >> the frightening moments and amazing end. live on the cnn newsroom. >>> good morning, thank you for joining us. i'm carol costello. three people dead at the marine base in quantico. the base is in lockdown, law enforcement surrounded the building. >> the shooter, an active duty marine, was pronounced dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound by law enforcement at the scene. two other victims, a male and female, both active duty marines, were pronounced dead at the scene. the three marines involved in this incident, all permanent personnel assigned to officer candidate school. all of the candidates in the school are accounted for and safe. >> the base is used mostly for training and it's known as crossroads of the marine corps. we will have a live report at the bottom hour. >>> also following a truly horrifying story from georgia's southern
should be used to tackle the deficit and invest in the middle class, not be used just to simply tax, cut tax rates for the rich the way that the house budget did. >> reporter: now the senate did not accept the paul ryan house budget. the patty murray budget, the senate plan will probably come up to a vote 2:00 a.m. or so. uma: 2:00 a.m. regardless how votes will go won't there be need for serious negotiations? >> reporter: no question about that the house has a very different version than the senate. the house said they would balance the budget without raising taxes. the senate is doing more spending, more taxes. so our colleague greta van susteren asked house budget chair paul ryan about next steps. >> house passed the budget. the senate is passing a budget first time we've seen that in four years. that's a good thing. the question is now can we start looking for common ground? can we started a advancing toward a compromise? the way we look at this as house republicans. we understand our budget probably won't become law in every great detail but hopefully we get a down payment on this p
. that's how many chicago schools will be closed because a $1 billion budget deficit. it's not clear how many teachers are lose their jobs, but they will close a bunch of schools. 43,000. that's how many jobs have been lost since j.c. penney -- at j.c. penney since ron johnson became ceo. a new report shows he let the company pay for at least nine executives to get work by two jets, which cost $41 million apiece. nice work if you can get it. mr. kilmeade? >> brian: or if you had it. it's one of the most outrageous stories of the week. one of the most popular pharmacies telling their employees to step on the scale or pay a penalty. cvs wants employees to report their weight, fat and glucose levels to health insurance bosses and if they don't, they get fined $600 a year. it might be legal, but is it fair? steven mitchell is an employment attorney and author of a book, "the employee rights handbook." and john is a professor at a law school. does this sound right to you? >> it's an outrage n my opinion. they're trying to help people's health, but when you impose a penalty on people, that's w
to close the 54 schools in an effort to make a dent in a $1 billion budget deficit, make better use of resources and improve overall education here in the nation's third largest school district. >> i don't think it's going to be good for my kids. >> reporter: the news of the school closings continues to ripple across chicago this morning. >> i'm, just don't know where they're going to go. >> reporter: mayor rahm emmanuel says the closures are necessary after too much money was being spent on maintaining underutilized school buildings saying "by consolidating these schools, chicago public schools can focus on safely getting every child into a better performing school. like school systems in new york and philadelphia, where schools are being closed, chicago must make tough choices." a number of teachers may lose their jobs as a result of the closings. karen lewis. of the teachers' union lashed out at emmanuel. >> our mayor, who is away on a ski trip, drops this information right before spring break. it's the ultimate bullying job. mayor rahm emmanuel should be ashamed of himself. >> r
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)